How I'm preparing to live tiny

We are so close now. Its only a few short weeks until we will finally be moving into our tiny home. Are we ready?


No, not really, is the honest answer. But we are getting there! Tiny living isn't a completely foreign concept to us. I currently live in a caravan (albeit a 3-bedroom static, so quite large!) and my partner has spent long periods of time living in his campervan. However, we still have plenty of work to do before we can comfortably live tiny on a more permanent basis. Read on to find out how we are preparing for this rather bonkers lifestyle...


Declutter


One of the biggest tasks before moving into a tiny home is decluttering. Although I am a minimalist, I've found that there is always more possessions that can be decluttered.


I was actually pretty excited about this process. I always feel immensely refreshed after a good clear out and this time I had a whole new challenge. Moving into our tiny home has put a whole new filter on what I'm holding on to. It has to really mean something, if it is going to take up precious space.



We will making the most of every storage opportunity, including the stairs!

Shopping ban


This one has been a challenge. I think one of the most exciting things about moving into a new home, is the excuse to shop for lovely new items to furnish your space. However, I've finally come to the conclusion, much to my partner's relief, that it is best to wait to buy anything for the house until we move in.


This is partially to save money, so we can use our limited budget for more essential items i.e. a composting toilet. Its also really difficult to know how much space we will have or what we will need until we move in. So, no more 'unnecessary' shopping., which is a tad dull but necessary!


Changing expectations


I remember when I stated that a heated towel rail was a must in the bathroom. My partner's face made me realise that this was, perhaps, a little naïve.


We will be living off-grid in our tiny home, we will have to be very careful with our resources. Our electricity will come from solar, but it will take a while before we can afford all the equipment for this. Even then, we live in the not so sunny Scottish Highlands, so we will have to be careful not to waste this precious resource.


The same goes with water. We won't be plumbed into mains, so our supply will come from a tank that we have to manually fill up. So those long showers come with a price!


This way of living ties in with my environmental values, so this feels like no sacrifice at all really, if it means I get to live in my dream home.


Bathroom in progress, where we will be having pretty snappy showers!

Planning around our lifestyle


One of the biggest perks of building our own home, is that we get to create a space that really works for us, rather than fitting ourselves into an existing home. Throughout the build process, we've assessed our current lifestyles and identified our priorities, so that we can make this space best work for us.


Sleep is a priority. I am an early bird (read why here) but my partner is more of a night owl. Or at least not a 5am early bird! To ensure we both get enough sleep, we made the decision to wall off our loft and really pack in the insulation, so that my early morning kettle boiling shouldn't result in too many grumpy protests!


We both work from home, at least on a part time basis, so prioritising quiet office space was a must, and this is likely how the guest loft will be used when we are visitor free. Otherwise, this space will be kept clear, to allow room for our visiting loved ones, which is also a must-have in our home.


Ignoring the critics


I am used to critics. I live a somewhat alternative life (read about how here), and have decided at the grand old age of 28, that I'm ok with not everyone being on board with my life choices.


Deciding to live in a tiny home is just another facet to my alternative life. The reactions I've got have been mixed, but there is a distinct feeling of complete confusion at why I would want to live this way. I once had a conversation with a colleague, who was under the assumption that this would be a temporary way of life, almost like play-acting at being an adult, before I get on the 'traditional' property ladder. I didn't feel the need to correct them with the fact that I see this as very much a permanent move. I don't plan to have children (read my reasons why here) and never want a lot of stuff, so why would I need to pay a mortgage, just to have more space I'll need to look after? This is a totally acceptable life choice of course, but it is not one we wanted.


I'm proud of our home, so will continue undeterred and only find amusement in the bemused expressions I receive when I give my address! Make sure to stay tuned for our imminent move, and subscribe to my newsletter for much more exclusive and behind the scenes content on our tiny home.